Skip to main content

About your Search

20121205
20121213
STATION
CNNW 12
MSNBCW 12
MSNBC 5
CNN 4
KQED (PBS) 4
CSPAN2 2
FBC 2
KQEH (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
CSPAN 1
WETA 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 56
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)
support the inflammatory flames heard on the floor of the u.s. senate used to block a u.n. treaty. a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the world. hundreds of millions. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute. some had signaled support for the treaty and then indicated they'd vote for it only to vote against it. one of the measure's co-sponsored, jerry mirrand, actually voted against it. so the guy who co-sponsored it voted against it. we asked him to come on the program yesterday, today as well. he declined. a former senator got involved on this as
that might support the inflammatory claims heard on the floor of the u.s. senate that were used to block a u.n. treaty, a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the entire world. now, the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities and it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. now, the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans or vets who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the treaty. 125 countries ratified the treaty but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republicans, senators, voted against it. their names right there on the right of the screen. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute, some senators had actually signaled support for the treaty, then indicated that they would vote for it only to vote against it. one of the actual measures co-sponsors of it, he actually voted against it. one of the co-sponsors. amazing. he voted against the bill he had co-sponsored. we asked him to com
. then this is the first time that foreign minister met with hillary clinton on assad, met with the u.n. mediator and we're being cautioned this is no break through but there will be follow-up meeting. seems some u.s. officials russia is hedging its bets or beginning to see a future without assad. >> i think that's the case. we've talked about this before, but there is a russian card to be played, to be played by russia itself. they have influence with president assad, they have interests in syria, and i think that they can see the handwriting on the wall that assad is eventually going to go, whether it's in the near term, long term, eventually he's going. you can see the shift in momentum as far as the rebels now starting to gain much greater military success than they have in the past. they've been weapons that have been able to take some helicopters out of the air, shoulder-fired missiles, et cetera. i think they can see the shift taking place and want to be in a position to help negotiate some sort of an acceptable ending to this where they can play the role of a peacemaker. so i think not with stan
minister sergei lavrov and the u.n. envoy for syria, lakhdar brahimi. >> we reviewed the very mr. brahimi had his own additional information to contribute about what he is hearing from sources inside syria and both minister lavrov and i committed to support a renewed push by brahimi and his team to work with all the stakeholders in syria to begin a political transition. meanwhile, rebels in syria made the damascus international airport an official battleground. they said it's a legitimate target and they urged civilians to stay clear. fighting near the airport and around the capital city has intensified in the past week. the latest amateur video showed street battles and a car set afire by a rocket attack. the exiled leader of hamas khaled meshaal entered gaza today for the first time. it was, in part, a show of defiance after the militant group's latest clash with israel. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: he crossed the border from egypt with tears in his eyes. the leader of hamas setting foot on palestinian territory for the firs
: a shocking real-life health crisis involving a former child star, why frankie m u.n. iz was rushed to the hospital. we are live at the breaking news desk. the new nears about chemical weapons in the civil war rocking syria, why the u.s. and the international community should be concerned. we'll go in-depth with ambassador bolton. jenna: right now we are learning about a serious health problem for a former child star, rick folbaum is live at the breaking news news desk with more. >> reporter: you don't usually hear about healthy 20 somethings having strokes. that's what doctors say happened to frankly m u.n. is. he was riding his motorcycle in phoenix when he lost vision in one eye. friends, including his fiancee got worried when he was acting very strangely. turns out he was having a mini stroke. here he is on "good morning america." >> something wasn't right. i knew i did not feel right. coy -pbt say words. couldn't say words. i thought i was saying them. my fiancee was looking at me like i was speaking a foreign language. maybe i had a bad headache, i don't know. i've never had a
kerry is firing back at senator rick santorum. it's all about this. opposition to a u.n. treaty. one that a lot of people thought was a no-brainer. it was about the rights of the disabled all over the world. we brought you this story yesterday. senate republicans rejecting this treaty on tuesday despite the fact that one of their own, bob dole, bob dole, a former majority leader, came to the floor in a wheelchair trying to draw support for this treaty. he was being pushed by his wife and made an impassioned plea. senator santorum explained opposition to this treaty in a piece published in "the daily beast." in part he says this. our nation has been been the worldwide leader when it comes to protecting the disabled. we should be telling the u.n. and not the other way around how to ensure dignity and respect for the disabled. effectively saying nobody tells the united states what to do. it sets a very dangerous precedent perhaps for other things. okay. that sounded legitimate until it came out that that's not what the treaty suggests. senator kerry was mincing absolutely no words in sa
the first action then that -- will we see emergency action at the u.n. perhaps this weekend? when is all this coming to a head? >> i think the russians keep moving in the direction they are, i do think they're there, sending all the signals that they are done with assad and so the market signals are there. i think you'll begin to see movement in the u.n. and, more importantly what's not being discussed the real contest about syria also involved iran. iran is the big proxy supporter of syria and, you know, we have this leak in "the new york times" or coverage in "the new york times" about a potential eventual bilateral discussion between the united states and iran. i think that solving syria, moving syria into a different place changes the game for all the other great powers with iran. >> i would love -- i'm out of time. i would love to get going with morsi. david sanger with egypt and morsi, is this going to be a situation, does he back off of this a little bit because there's such an uprising? >> yeah, you'd think so but so far his public signals have been doubling down on passing the c
, secretary of state hillary clinton is coming to the defense of u.n. ambassador susan rice, calling her a stalwart colleague. rice is seen as a top pick to succeed clinton in the state department, but is under attack by republicans who accuse her of misleading the public in the aftermath of the september 11th attacks at the u.s. consulate in benghazi. >> and it's important to remember what susan said was based on the information that had been given to every senior official in our administration, and she made very clear in her appearances that the information was subject to change as more facts were gathered and analyzed by the intelligence community. and look, as is often the case, our understanding evolved over time. and we've done our best to keep the american people and the congress informed. that was her goal, that was her mission and she should not be criticized for doing exactly that. >> that, of course, comes in direct conflict with what general david petraeus, the director of the cia, told the committee in the senate where he said they knew immediately after the attack, the next
of human rights abuses in iran. i would just read very briefly from the report that the u.n. special rapporteur for iran files with the u.s. assembly september 20th 11 in the repertoire highlighted a pattern of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations special rapporteur on human rights for for several years now. september 2011 the u.n. general submitted a report in which he said he was deeply troubled by reports of increased numbers of executions come amputations, arbitrary arrest and detention, unfair trials, torture and ill-treatment in a crackdown on human rights activists, lawyers, an opposition that exists. just to draw one prefix ample from the weeks news, there is actually a guess what qualifies in iran briefly is good news, a well-known human rights lawyer ended her 49 day hunger strike on december 4th. her name is nazarene to show day. she has been imprisoned in prison since 20 tenanted machine had imposed a travel ban on her has been an-year-old daughter, sushi was on a hunger strike for 49 days and has actually stopped the hunger s
of the dictator kim jung un. >> this is against the u.n. security council resolutions and we are monitoring the situation closely. and working very closely with the self-defense force and the ministry of defense. this is a dangerous situation. and we do not support those actions right now by north korea. bill: steven yates, sir, good morning and welcome back here to america's newsroom. it's been some time since we talked about this issue. now it's back and on the plate. >> any time you are dealing with long range missile capability it will be a concern. we have thousands of troops stationed in japan and korea. there is talk of being able to reach los angeles or the western coast. no north korean test so far has reached that near abroad. bill: what would korea want to prove with this launch? >> always dangerous to try to climb into the mind of a north korean leader. but there would have to be a domestic component to the situation. there are important elections taking place in japan on the 16th and south korea on the 19th of this month. well within the range of this test that is scheduled to
and the u.n. special envoy to syria. as you know, russia has blocked action against al assad at the u.n., but some have speculate that had moscow may be considering a different aprove. i mean, is russia stopping the u.s., do you think, from going into syria? >> i think the russians are beginning to realize that this problem simply cannot be ignored, and their passive stance on it simply doesn't provide for any constructive solution, so i hope that they will work with us on this, and i think the more international consensus we have on what is to be done, the less likely is the danger that the removal of the regime will result in the fragmentation of syria all together and regional conflicts erupting. that is the real danger, and that's what people should be concentrating on. >> you know, some have made the comparison that getting involved with syria or in syria is similar to us getting involved in libya and taking action against libya. do you see it that way? >> not quite. i supported strongly the position that the united states took on libya because there was an identifiable enemy, and
, isn't syria like what happened in bosnia? and so many, including u.n. officials have said what's happening in syria is very similar to what's happened in bosnia with the wholesale slaughter of innocent civilians. but i think from the administration's point of view, they're looking at iraq and they don't want to get into an iraq type of multi-year operation. >> and former senator george mitchell has said the united states needs to stay out syria, while senator mccain said they need to get involved. what is at stake? >> they don't want to get bogged down. nobody is talk about putting american boots on the ground. the question is can you take other military measures that will stop this war? i think what you have now, most seasoned observers and most people who look at what could possibly be done to mitigate this nearly two-year war now in which more than 40,000 people, men, women, and children have been slaughtered and after nearly two years of this administration saying, you know, the assad must step down, and it not happening. the best one can hope for, perhaps, is that some kin
flew to dublin to hold a meeting with her russian counter part and u.n. enjoy to syria meeting to discuss how they would end the now 21-month long conflict in syria and how to move assad from power. and there's no sign they had to reverse the support, and today, a senior lawmaker says the syria government is now incapable of functioning properly. just before the meeting with the russian foreign minister, secretary clinton insisted that the united states and russia share common goals in the region. >> trying hard to work hard with russia to stop the bloodshed in syria and begin a political transition to a post asad future. the pressure against the regime in and around damascus seems to be increasing. lou: at home, leon pa net fa issuing the -- panetta issuing the sharpest warning yet. >> the president of the united states made it clear there will be consequences. there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using chemical weapons on their own people. lou: neither the white house or pentagon elaborating on what the cons -- consequences would be, but
at the u.n. and has deep ties into assad's regime. if they begin to walk away from syria and there appear to be signals that they are distancing themselves, that will put pressure on those around assad to make sure that they do not take assad's lead in potentially using these weapons and helpses move towards the resolution of this. >> you have a ground strategy perhaps being considered and then you have an air strategy. air seems to be the one that's being discussed most because it can be most surgical. is there such a thing when we're talking about chemical weapons as being a surgical military option? >> there is not a clear surgical military it would take 75,000 troops to secure the sites that we know of, dropping ordinance on-sites that have sarin and even mustard gas and other nerve agents can be very damaging, get blown away in the wind. it's not clear this is surgical. the key thing is to ensure this country doesn't implode, that there's a managed transition, that assad has moved out in a manner that does latch up with the political process that secretary clinton described of intern
program. the u.n. security council will now meet tomorrow to discuss possible actions against north korea. want to get you back now to piers morgan, who is in washington, d.c. tonight with a very special interview. >> welcome to the senate committee on foreign relations. this is where some of the most sense sensitive global issues are discussed. tonight i'm sitting down with three legendary citizens, john mccain senior senator from arizona, presidential candidate and ranking member on the armed services committee, joe lieberman, senior senator from connecticut and was on the ticket with al gore, and lindsey graham, the senior senator from south carolina, a member of the armed services appropriations and budget committees. welcome the you three. the three amigos. as dubbed by general petraeus. >> you forgot to mention he ran for president also and lost and he'll run and lose some day. >> this is -- john, much too often as we travel has described us as the losers caucus. once we were in pakistan and the ambassador -- this was 2002, the ambassador was good enough to give a dinner in our hono
hope you're wrong. good to see you. have a good weekend. >>> hillary clinton is defending u.n. ambassador susan rice calling her a colleague. she has come under fire about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. >> our understanding evolved over time and we've done our best to keep the american people and the congress informed. that was her goal. that was her mission, and she should not be criticized for doing exactly that. my moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. i decided enough is enough. ♪ [ spa lady ] i started enbrel. it's clinically proven to provide clearer skin. [ rv guy ] enbrel may not work for everyone -- and may not clear you completely, but for many, it gets skin clearer fast, within 2 months, and keeps it clearer up to 9 months. [ male announcer ] because enbrel®, etanercept, suppresses your immune system, it may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal, events including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, and nervous system and blood disorders have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for t
their backs, rejecting a u.n. treaty that bans discrimination against those with disabilities around the world. senator jim demint said speaker boehner's $800 billion tax hike will destroy american jobs. yes, he said speaker boehner. one party proposes increase in an effort to counter them. the other party's leadership proposes, wait for it, $800 billion in tax increases and then former alaska governor sarah palin blasting boehner's decision to remove some conservatives from plum house committee assignments writing, come on now, gop. don't go wobbly on us. congressman jim jordan, an influential group of conservatives criticized the boehner plan. >> the problem i have with the republican proposal, frankly, is that it does raise taxes. the thing we need is economic growth. you're not going to grow the economy, put in place a framework conducive to job creation if you're raising ta s taxes. >> oklahoma senator tom coburn said conservative criticism might not be all that bad. >> i think that helps boehner. >> he's drawn a line in the sand for the fiscal conservatives and it communicates to both t
minister sergei lavrov and u.n. envoy lakdar brahimi who spoke to the press. >> we haven't taken any sensational decisions but i think we have agreed that the situation is bad and we have agreed that we must continue to work together to see how we can find creative ways of bringing this problem under control and hopefully starting to solve it. >> brown: all of this, amid rising fears that the syrian president might use chemical weapons against the rebels. in washington, defense secretary leon panetta joined a chorus of u.s. warnings. >> the intelligence that we have raises serious concerns that this is being considered. >> reporter: those concerns were echoed on capitol hill. >> if syrian tv is catching this news conference, there's been a tidal shift here to where military force will be used to prevent those chemical weapons from ever seeing the light of day. >> brown: but syria's deputy foreign minister, speaking on lebanese t.v., charged that if anyone is planning to use chemical warfare, it's the west. >> ( translated ): we have strong fear of the existence of a conspiracy to use
this time around. several nations and the u.n. secretary general have repeatedly warned that this is a potential threat and repeatedly warn president assad not to go through it here. >> shepard: there is another thought and dangerous one that assad is just playing a game. >> the idea that he is finally completely desperate. is he realizing finally that he is now surrounded by the rebels in damascus. they are getting closer and closer to it ousting him. that ouster, if he stays there, would end in his death. so, this might be a final negotiating employee on the -- ploy on the part of president assad with the international community. listen. >> another way to look at it though, he wants russia and others to notice he is taking this potentially suicidal step in the hopes of one last diplomatic solution that so far he has been against. but he may now sees a his only hope. so maybe if russia is persuaded that assad is on the doorstep of defeat or suicide for that matter, effective suicide, that russia will finally help us do a deal to get a power sharing arrangement. >> so a
of the ringleaders in voting down the u.n. treaty for people with disabilities this week. >> that was one of the saddest days, so anyone who was a party to that, well, i wish them well wherever they are going and hope that we can have more of our values represented there. >> it was demint and his tea party allies who pushed the country to the brink of default back in 2011. this is what demint told abc news about republicans who tried to strike a debt deal. >> what happens if -- what happens to republicans who go along with a debt ceiling increase? if they go along with the debt ceiling increase without a balanced budget amendment and the kind of stuff you're talking about? >> i think for the most part they're gone. it would be the most toxic vote we could take. >> demint's far right ideology is a key reason nothing gets done in this congress. house speaker john boehner is currently being pressured by demint and his followers to refuse any debt deal with tax increases. demint was on rush limbaugh's radio show today with heritage president ed fulner. life isn't going to get any easier for j
led by the u.n. special envoy to syria. >> the united states stands with the syrian people in insisting that any transition process result in a unified, democratic syria in which all citizens are represented. a future of this kind cannot possibly include assad. >> the syrian conflict is also aif he canning the region now. beyond the fears of chemical weapons being used, today the jordanian armed forces returned fire after several shells fired from syria landed in their territory and wounded a soldier. up next back here, big earthquake hits the same japanese coast devastated by last year's massive quake, and what the white house is considering doing that could prevent colorado and washington state from enacting those new pot laws. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- ♪ you can stay in and like something... ♪ [ car alarm deactivates ] ♪ ...or you can get out there with your family and actually like something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. go ahead, mark your
today met with russia's foreign minister and syria's u.n. peace envoy to negotiate a peace strategy for that country. >>> egyptian president mohamed morsi is asking for a dialogue with protesters. demonstrators are upset about the constitutional declaration that morsi is granted more power. he said he will go through with it. >>> a toxic cloud forced a mass evacuation in downtown buenos aires, argentina today. a shipping container filled with pesticides exploded and caused a cloud of gas. people ran out of offices with their faces covered in an effort to escape the fumes. many people complained that the sulfur-like odor called mild respiratory irritation. the fire is now reportedly und control. >>> new of a change to the metro's silver line that could cost millions. they said it's a crucial improfit for safety. adam tuss is live at the lafaunt metro station with more on how this could impact computers. adam? >> reporter: doreen, plans are changing for the silver line, and not only could it cost the transit agency more, but it could also leave some riders with a very long wait. here'
that was negotiated by republican president george herbert walker bush. it was signed by george walker bush at the u.n., and republican attorney general richard thornburg has testified the former attorney general of the united states, there's no legal requirement whatsoever for the united states to change anything. rick santorum was just not factual. what he did, he gave some people here an excuse to hide behind that when they know that there are people who hate the united nations, who don't want any united nations treaty. and so they gave them a reason to be able to say this is why i'm voting against it. we're going to come back with the hearings next year, again that will show people exactly what the facts are. we'll have all the witnesses in. i think it can be december positive. and ultimately, i would be prepared to put into the treaty language of the resolution of ratification language that can make it more clear than it is today if that will satisfy them. >> the other argument that some of these republicans were making at least to me privately over the past few days, when i was beginning to get
or not senators mccain and others are upset at the president. if you look at her u.n. record and, more importantly, her state department record, senator albright was furious with her and put her on probation. she has a terrible record among professional diplomats in the same -- i don't know if she was a terrible desk officer from ethiopia, genocide, which is the president says is one of his greatest regrets or mistakes, those were all on his watch. if she did such a terrible job there, how can she be a secretary? >> the president has been able to rehash that old garbage that mary is talking about. they have not done so now. they are talking about trumped-up charges and old regrets and on issues that, you know, would come out in a nomination hearing if she is nominated but i would just say, as an ambassador to the u.n., she's done an excellent job. she's served our country well and president obama ought to be able to make the choice based on who he wants as secretary of state. >> president clinton has told me on several occasions, mary and hilary, his greatest regret as far as being a president on
. without having to go through congress were without having to get ratification of the u.n. treaty. megyn: it is another system. it looks kind of like cap-and-trade from what i'm reading. where have you, and west virginia, if you want to have a certain number of coal power plants come you have to trade -- there can only be one toll number of omissions and the states have to work it out amongst themselves. >> that is unlikely to go into effect. it would be too hard to pull that out. that is what this group is talking about. the epa really doesn't need to worry about that. they can just crack down on industry on their own. congressman stutzman, and there are enough democrats bases that may join with republicans to push back the epa. in all likelihood, the president found the sweet spot where he can go out there and his team can go out there and really crack down on carbon emissions and deal with global warming, but do it in a way that doesn't require approval. megyn: what happens if you violate the new epa standards? reporter: the people that run the plants will be fined into oblivion. it w
-- namely, the one enunciated by the international court of justice, the u.n., human rights organizations -- this framework is the furthermost limit to which jewish liberal opinion can be carried, because it is the limit of the global liberal consensus. the end of the american jewish romance with israel will be a boon not only for the palestinians, but for the israelis as well. since the june 1967 war, israel has been a stage on which american jews have played out their fantasies of toughnesses, often from martha's vineyard -- [laughter] and a pawn in their pursuit of power and privilege. if israel has become a crazy state -- and it has -- it is in no small part because of american jews. by abetting its most retrograde tendencies and freeing it of needful restraints, they have exerted the baleful influence on israeli society. but american jews now have an opportunity to right a double wrong; the horror inflicts on palestine -- inflicted on palestine and the damage caused to israel. if the liberal conscience of american jews is pricked and finally they do the right thing, the long, dark ni
who was wounded while serving our country in world war ii. watching the u.n. disability treaty pass in the senate where he spent 27 years of his life was to be the cap on his life as a great republican and a fine american. that's how they treat one of their own. plus a -- [ applause ] >> wow. >> stephanie: hello doris in kentucky. >> caller: hello steph. we live -- ashley judd is exploring the possibility of running for the seat of mitch mcconnell. >> stephanie: i think that's awesome. >> we couldn't be anymore excited. we're bursting at the seams. louisville is supporting it. i think what she said this morning is to see if -- to see the possibility. but we're -- trying to stay connected on the web and let her know we'll support her. we will start some progress of trying to get this man off of the senate. >> stephanie: yep absolutely. we will be all over that to eject the turtle from his terrarium in kentucky. >> send him back to the galapagos. >> stephanie: for smokin' hot actress ashley judd. we wer
by the rebels, there's no talk of the diplomatic efforts. the trips and leadings of hillary clinton with the u.n. and her russian counter part, there's no hope here for a diplomatic solution. instead, what people talk about is the suffering of the people. the people are showing tremendous resilience. this house was bombed by mistake. the people that live here live next to a rebel commander. now, they are homeless. there's tremendous economic difficulties here. the syrian currency is worth half of what it was worst when the war began. a loaf of bread cost 20 times what it did months ago. the rebels are making advances. they hope to soon control the city, the commercial capital. after that, damascus. richard engel, nbc news. >> we are also hearing new reaction off capitol hill. it's the supreme court's decision to take up two challenges to same-sex marriage. regardless of public opinion, it belongs to the nation's highest court. >> prior to this election, every vote has been and made it through a legislature, not the vote of the people. it's always in california, the people voted itself. we'll loo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)